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CA Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development releases in-hospital death rates for three medical conditions

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The California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development has released on its Web site (oshpd.ca.gov) in-hospital death rates for three medical conditions – acute stroke, gastrointestinal bleeding and hip fracture – as well as five surgical procedures, using data from 2006 and 2007.

The report, which required acute-care hospitals to participate, rated facilities as better than, worse than or on par with the state average for the eight categories, adjusting for whether the hospital treats a greater number of very sick, high-risk patients.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports of the state’s 384 such hospitals, 25 performed better than the state average on at least one of the procedures or conditions, and 94 did worse in 2007. In 2006, 33 hospitals scored better than average, and 98 rated worse on at least one of the indicators.

The report used measures developed by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The surgical procedures featured in the report are esophageal resection, or the removal of all of part of the esophagus; pancreatic resection; craniotomy, which is done to open the skull; carotid endarterectomy, an operation to prevent strokes; and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, commonly known as “cardiac cath,” to open blocked coronary arteries.

California is among about 15 states that mandate the release of some medical outcome data. The state in recent years has released 30-day mortality rates for coronary artery bypass graft surgery and pneumonia.

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